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4 Signs He’s Not Feeling the Spark and You Need to...

Trying to figure out whether a guy likes you can be exasperating. It could be like he’s showing interest or maybe he’s just being nice because she doesn’t want to offend you.

However, when a guy really likes you, it is usually obvious—so too when he doesn’t. The uncertainty comes to picture when he falls somewhere in between. Since every woman who’s in the dating scene would want to know whether a guy likes them or not, here are some signs that’s screaming they need to move in because he’s just not that into you.

1. You always make the first move.
Of course, there’s nothing wrong with women making the first move. But that shouldn’t mean that you should always be the one to ask him out and keep things moving along. Does it look like he’s just saing yes to whatever you say, but is not actually pursuing to get your attention? The, that’s a red flag.

2. You’re the one who’s making all the plans.
Look back on the last few dates you had. Were you the one making the plans every single time you go out? Were you the one who chose the restaurant or bar? You might think that your date at the arcade was cute and fun, but if you suggested for that and he just agreed with you, maybe he just went along because he had nothing else to do. That may sound harsh, but it could be true. You want your partner to work with you and put in some effort to every plan you make, if he doesn’t, well maybe because he’s not that into you.

3. You envy other couples.
When you’re single, it just makes sense when you feel envious of couples. However, when you’re already in a relationship, you should not feel that way since you already have someone you share interests and you’re satisfied with. Therefore, feeling jealous of couples is a sign that something is not going right and you are not treated the way you need and want to.

4. You remember everything, while he remembers nothing
This can make you feel like an idiot. It’s like you think you are already a couple and he is treating you like you just first met. If you know so much about him and always remember to ask how his day went, but he can’t remember your favourite restaurant or something you just brought up yesterday, that’s not a good sign.

It can be hard to admit, but if you can relate to any of these signs, you might want to check with him what he’s really up to for the both of you—whether or not you’re officially a couple.

4 Phone Battery Myths, Debunked!

In the past few years, smartphone manufacturers worked hard to improve the quality and lifespan of phone batteries—and a lot has changed ever since. It means that those tips you heard to stretch out your phone’s battery life five to 10 years ago may no longer be as effective as they once were.

So, before telling your friend with iPhone X to disable his Wi-Fi or Bluetooth, let us shed some light on the old beliefs that many of us are probably still preaching about.

Myth 1: It’s detrimental to the battery to keep it plugged in overnight.
Your touchscreen phone is called smartphone for a reason—it has smart technology that automatically stops your phone from charging when its battery reaches 100 percent recharged. Instead of continuous supply of energy from the power source to the battery, your phone enters ‘trickle charge’ mode when it is plugged in and full. With that being said, leaving your gadget charging overnight is not detrimental to its battery.

Myth 2: Keeping your Wi-Fi switched on will kill the battery sooner.
Although this is slightly true, it isn’t noticeable. Keeping your Wi-Fi does consume some energy, but very mild that that you cannot notice it. When your phone automatically searches for Wi-Fi connection, it is only catching signals from access points to let you know that there are connections nearby. This is a very low energy-consuming task and is not taking up to much battery juice at all.

Myth 3: Avoid using your phone when charging.
You’ve probably heard this advice from a concerned mom or from your tech-savvy grandpa. They say that using your phone while it is plugged in can electrocute you or make your phone explode. Although the recharging time before your battery fully juiced up is longer when your phone is in use, the performance of a charging phone’s circuitry is the same. So, if you need to make an important call or want to check your Facebook, fiddling with your phone while charging won’t harm you.

Myth 4: Disabling functions like Location Services and Bluetooth drastically improves battery life.
While this used to be true, Bluetooth and Location Services of smartphones today are no longer as bloodthirsty as before. If they used to suck the life out of your old phone’s battery like a vampire, now you can enable the function all day without noticing its toll on your phone’s performance. Although this additional use of service means additional use of energy, we are talking about a very little battery life difference—like 30 minutes shorter over the span of 24 hours, not really worth the hassle.

Now that you have a clearer idea of what your smartphone is really capable of doing, try to maximize its usage. After all, smartphones do not come cheap, so try to make the most out of yours.

How to Avoid Food Poisoning While Travelling Abroa...

Vomiting and diarrhea are the most unwanted companions any traveler could have. But how can you experience authentic local foods in a new place without troubling your stomach?

Here, we’ll spell out some tricks on how to avoid food poisoning, while still being able to eat like a local.

1. Find a busy place
A busy and well-visited place means higher food turnover, which also means greater food freshness and less likely that what you’re having has been sitting around for long hours at unstable temperature. So even if you have to wait for your food to be served, simply take it as a little sacrifice for a safer meal that won’t trouble your tummy during your entire vacation.

2. Go for hot and steaming foods
High temperatures kill germs and bacteria that can cause digestive problems. Lukewarm and cool temperature, on the other hand, encourages bacterial growth. When deciding on a meal, find places that serve freshly cooked items—ones that you can see smoking and steaming hot when served.

3. Opt for fruits with peels
Exploring developing countries is not the best time to try out fresh salads or any raw food. But since it’s inevitable to crave for fresh fruits, look for ones that you have to peel yourself. Avoid peeled mangoes and fruit juices from street vendors. Instead, visit a fruit and veggie market and buy unpeeled fruits, like bananas, oranges, pineapple, watermelon and the like, for your own consumption.

4. Look for signs of good hygiene
When eating locally, expect different food standards from your home country. Vendors may prepare your food with their bare hands and probably most of the food is not properly stored. However, there are still many who you can trust when it comes to food hygiene. Look for things like tongs and serving utensils, food covers, steaming hot food and sinks with water and soap when deciding where to dine.

5. Always wash your hands before eating
Your very own two hands can also be a cause of stomach problems. Besides making sure that your food is handled hygienically, also ensure you have clean hands before touching your food. At the very least carry sanitizing wet wipes or a pocket sanitizer you can use before and after every meal.

6. Drink Safe Water
Tap water is one of the common causes of stomach problems among travelers. But even if you’re buying a bottle of water or any beverage from a mini mart, see to it that it’s safe and clean by checking the seal. It should be intact, and the bottle should not be distorted or damaged in any way.

Street and local foods are an essential part of travelling and experiencing the place’s culture, and the fear of food poisoning shouldn’t stop you from trying authentic local cuisines. Knowing what to do in advance is the key to enjoying authentic food and making sure that you stay healthy all throughout your trip.

5 Easy Ways to Avoid Split Ends

If no matter how much hot oil and conditioning products you slather onto your tresses, your ends still keep on splitting, you’re probably doing something wrong in your hair styling or washing routing. For those who use curling irons and strengtheners on a daily basis and color your tresses quite regularly, split ends is a battle that we never seem to win.

However, if we take a closer look at how we handle our hair, we will be able to tackle the root cause of the problem and be able to prevent further breakage of your strands.

1. Learn to make second-day hair work
The importance of hygiene in maintaining healthy hair can’t be stressed enough. Of course, it’s necessary to take a shower. But sometimes, putting your hair up in a bun and going for a quick shower is just as fine and actually is very healthy for your hair. Every other day washing allows your tresses to restore its health with its natural oils, leaving your hair smooth and naturally protected. You might even be surprised to know how second- or even third-day hair holds up a hairstyle for longer.

2. Brush your hair correctly
First pick the right brush to use. For everyday brushing, go for a cushioned paddle hair brush with rubbery bristles to make detangling of hair easier. Be careful with plastic bristles as it can be too harsh for wet hair and can rip the strands apart. Next, do the brushing correctly. Do not tug on your hair from roots to tips. Do it by section to slowly detangle your hair. Do it by section—from roots, mid shaft to the tips.

3. Shampoo your scalp, not your ends
Avoid piling all your hair on top of your hear when shampooing. The unnatural rubbing, plus the chemicals from the shampoo, will make your hair brittle and prone to split ends. Instead, just let your hair hang down and concentrate the shampoo onto the roots. The suds as your rinse your hair is enough to wash away grease and dirt from your ends.

4. Condition your ends, not your scalp
Shampooing is for scalp, while conditioning is for the ends. Apply most of yoru conditioner directly to the ends of your strands, and then let it soak in for at least a minute. Avoid conditioning the roots as it will only weight the hair down and promote production of more oil, making your hair look greasy much quicker.

5. Tap your hair with towel to dry
Do not rub your hair with towel when drying them. Wet hair is vulnerable to breakage, thus promoting more split ends. Instead of rubbing wrap a soft-clothed towel around your hair to draw moisture out. Then, let it air dried partially before blow drying them.

Your hair is your crowning glory. With all the styling and products you put on it, your tresses deserves some TLC from you.

3 Arts and Heritage Parks in Singapore

Singapore has a rich and important history, and they can be seen In Singapore’s many parks. By visiting one of the arts and heritage parks in Singapore, you can learn about the rich history and culture of Singapore, all the while immersing yourself in tranquil nature and spending your time with friends and loved ones. Make your next outing a memorable and informative one by visiting one of the many arts and heritage parks here in the Lion City. To start you off, here is a short list of three of the many parks in Singapore.

1. Fort Canning Park
Fort Canning Park is a great park for a weekend outing, especially for those with families. While being chock-full of history and information, it is also a park with a lot of activities happening every day. There are many historically significant artifacts that you can see in Fort Canning Park, like the Fort Canning Park Bridge and the 9-Pound Cannon. Aside from the historical significance of Fort Canning, there are also exhibits for local art aficionados, like the ASEAN Sculpture Trail.

There are even many more things you could do in Fort Canning. You can bring the whole family to the many events that they hold. Even without events, you could still pack a picnic basket and eat with your loved ones on their picnic grounds.

2. Tiong Bahru Park
This 3.3-hectare park was redesigned in 2000 to with the theme ‘Old Frame, New Images,’ which melded new designs with old infrastructures. This park is great for families with small children, as it has a playground with such a unique design that it can only tickle the imagination of youngsters. Tiong Bahru’s playground is designed to look like a train tilted at many spots in different angles so that kids can weave in and out of the carriages. There is even a merry-go-round and a maze, for more kiddie adventures. Meanwhile, their parents and guardians can go on a run on the roads near the park, or buy a quick cup of coffee to drink while watching their children.

3. Pearl’s Hill City Park
For those whose idea of a good outing puts rest and relaxation at the top of the list, Pearl’s Hill City Park is the park for you. A hidden gem in the corner of Chinatown, this park is a place of calm and quiet, giving you a break from the noise and busyness of the city. While you’re there, you could rest under the Tembusu trees, or watch the stillness of the pond waters. When you’re done with your break, simply walk back into the fast-paced hustle and bustle of the city feeling calm and rejuvenated.